Ben Carson Challenged in Iowa by Atheist Voter

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By Angela Wills

Last Friday, presidential hopeful Ben Carson was in Iowa City speaking at a rally when questions, and even an unexpected confrontation or two, arose regarding religion. One gentleman, who described himself as an atheist voter, born and raised in Iowa, pointed his camera phone at Carson, a Seventh-day Adventist, and asked if elected president, would he adhere to God’s law above the law of the United States.

Carson responded in a manner true to form. Clapping his hands, he replied, “Everybody, including atheists, live according to their faith. It’s just what they decide to put their faith in…In my case, I have strong faith in God and I live by godly principles…Fortunately, our Constitution, the supreme law of our land, was designed by men of faith. And it has a Judeo-Christian foundation. Therefore, there is no conflict there. So it is not a problem.”

Up next, Lynda Ambrose, a 64-year-old supporter of Carson from Oxford, Iowa proclaimed, “I’m a Christian, I’ll pray for that atheist guy.” To which the self-described atheist responded, “Please don’t.”

Tension plagued the crowd-filled room in an otherwise classic Carson event: the candidate presented childhood stories, American History lessons, poetic charm regarding morality, and offered bits and pieces of inspiring words of wisdom.

“There’s a reason God gave us a brain with the ability to dream. Because sometimes the dream is the only thing that gets you through. Sometimes the going gets very, very difficult, and you have to grasp unto the impossible dream and reach when your arms are too weary, and grasp it.” He told the audience.

These days, Carson’s dreams of becoming president of the United States, at best, can only be described as wishful thinking. Months ago, he placed first in the Iowa polls, but now he’d be hopeful to even finish in the top three on Monday. He attributes his decline to the San Bernardino and Paris shootings, believing that voters mistake his soft tone for weakness.

Still, the neurosurgeon believes that there are great things to come and that we should never guess about things that we’ll soon know.

For voters such as Ambrose, this inner peace that Carson has is what motivates her to believe that Carson is the best man for the job.

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